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SPAD XIII Model, Pierre Marinovitch - Corgi AA37909


SPAD XIII Model, Pierre Marinovitch - Corgi AA37909 - click to enlarge
SPAD XIII Model, Pierre Marinovitch - Corgi AA37909 - click to enlarge


Item No. CG-AA37909
$55.95
Quantity:
Availability: In Stock


Description

Corgi Aviation Archive Series Diecast Model

SPAD XIII – 'White 3', Pierre Marinovitch, Escadrille Spa 94 'The Reapers', French Air Service, 1918, ‘Youngest French Air Ace of WWI’

1:48 Scale.  Length: 5.1".  Wingspan: 6.6"



Limited Edition of 1,200 Models Worldwide


Only sixteen years of age at the start of WWI, Pierre Marinovitch made no secret of his desire to do his duty and fight for his country. At only seventeen, Marinovitch enlisted in the 27e Régiment de Dragoons, only to quickly change his mind and apply for pilot training, successfully gaining his wings in the spring of 1917.

Following a period of illness, he was assigned to Escadrille Spa 94 'The Reapers' and by the end of 1917 already had three aerial victories to his name. Known as 'Marino' to his squadron mates, his flying style was not liked by all, with some questioning his flying ability and simply describing him as a good shot, however, nobody could doubt his bravery and aggression in the air.

As his victory tally continued to rise he also aroused the attention of the French press, desperate to find heroes with which to inspire a population scarred by war and who proclaimed Marinovitch to be 'The youngest ace', by virtue of his tender years. Throughout the rest of 1918 Marinovitch victory tally would continue to rise and by the end of hostilities, he had at least 21 aerial victories to his name, the highest scoring ace in his squadron and the 12th ranking French ace of the war.

Continuing to fly after the war, Marinovitch was tragically killed in a flying accident on October 2, 1919, only weeks after celebrating his 21st birthday. With the emergence of the aeroplane as an essential weapon of war during the savage fighting of the Great War, many of the world's early aviators chose to embellish their aircraft with flamboyant paint and distinctive markings, which seemed rather appropriate for these knights of the air.

Many of these emblems may have had their origins in the heraldic symbols of the past, or simply represent an individual pilot's desire to stand out from the crowd, however, they quickly became an invaluable recognition aid for fellow pilots during the melee of a swirling dogfight. More readily associated with airmen of the central powers one of the most distinctive markings adopted by an Allied unit during WWI was the “Grim Reaper” carried by the fighters of Escadrille Spa 94 of the French Air Service, a particularly sinister sight in the skies above the trenches.

This certainly proved to be the case during the last year of the war as the Spad fighters flown by French and American airmen began to take a heavy toll of Luftstreitkrafte aircraft. Young French pilot Pierre Marinovitch gained his 'Ace' status on January 19, 1918, with the shared destruction of Jasta 19 Albatros 2111/17, flown by Martin Mallmann, north of Manre-Beine – interestingly he shared the victory with American Austen Ballard Crehore, Marinovitch's best friend and regular flying partner.

In 1917, after acknowledging the failings of the SPAD S.VII compared to contemporary German fighters, SPAD built the S.XIII. Constructed primarily of wood with a fabric covering, this French biplane had a similar layout to its predecessor but with two Vickers machine guns replacing the single machine gun used on the S.VII, as well as a more powerful engine. The SPAD S.XIII was first flown in April 1917 with deliveries to the French Aéronautique Militaire starting the following month. Despite some performance problems, including poor maneuverability, and controllability at low speeds, the SPAD S.XIII was one of the most capable fighters of World War I.

A total of 8,472 SPAD S.XIIIs were built with orders for around 10,000 more that were cancelled at the Armistice. The S.XIII remained in service with France as a fighter until 1923. Other Allied forces also adopted the fighter, with SPAD XIIIs equipping 15 of the 16 operational U.S. pursuit squadrons at the Armistice.


The Corgi Aviation Archive features a wide selection of high quality, ready-made, diecast model airplanes. Each model is crafted with meticulous attention to detail, using specifications of the original aircraft. Corgi models are built with diecast metal and some plastic components.

This model of a SPAD XIII features:

  • Die-cast metal fuselage
  • Detailed pilot figure
  • Historically accurate printed markings
  • Rotatable propeller with wood grain effect
  • Detailed wing rigging
  • Display stand
  • Numbered collector card
  • Box with SPAD XIII artwork



  • Category: Corgi Biplane and Triplane Aircraft Models


    Not suitable for children under the age of 14


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